NZDF

Hastings Man's Aviation Fuel Career Taking Him Around the World

Leading Aircraftman Josh Evans next to the RNZAF C-130 Hercules at Exercise Mobility Guardian in the United States.
Leading Aircraftman Josh Evans next to the RNZAF C-130 Hercules at Exercise Mobility Guardian in the United States.

11 August 2017

A job working with fuel is taking a 21-year-old Hastings man around the world with the Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF).

Leading Aircraftman Josh Evans, an aviation refueller with the RNZAF, is currently in Washington State in the United States taking part in Mobility Guardian, a biennial air mobility exercise.

More than 80 countries and more than 3,000 airmen, soldiers, sailors, and Marines are taking part alongside the United States Air Force in the exercise, which is designed to sharpen airmen’s skills in dynamic, contested environments.

The RNZAF has sent a C-130 Hercules aircraft, with two crews and a support team.

Leading Aircraftman Evans, a former St John’s College student, was attracted to the Air Force at age 17, after hearing about the opportunities it offered.

“A family friend gave me a good insight into the service,” he said. “You don’t necessarily know just how much opportunity and the trade variety that is available for people within the Air Force.”

Exercise Mobility Guardian is his latest overseas deployment. He has been to Australia for Exercise Talisman Sabre and Exercise Pitch Black and also spent time in Antarctica supporting the United States Antarctic programme.

When not on deployment he runs the ground fuel operations at the RNZAF Base Ohakea fuel section. His role includes day-to-day management of fuel operations, making sure fuel is delivered to aircraft on time, transport tasks and problem solving.

He also juggles study for a business degree.

“Defence has been great in supporting this,” he said. “I can work go and listen to a lecture and then come back to work – the flexibility is great.”

Leading Aircraftman Evans grew up competing in motocross but after a few significant injuries decided to look for another adrenaline-based sport that involved motors but wasn’t as hard on the body. Drifting got the tick and after building his own car he competes occasionally.

“With work and study I don’t get to compete that often but I support a friend who does it more seriously than I do.”

The Air Force had delivered everything he expected in a career, he said.

“I wanted to work in an organisation where there are opportunities to explore different areas, so people are not limited to what they choose on the first day. This is definitely the case here.

“The opportunities are there for you to go down various tracks. You’re not limited to what you can do or achieve. You can go down any path if you’re keen enough.”

A job working with fuel is taking a 21-year-old Hastings man around the world with the Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF).

Leading Aircraftman Josh Evans, an aviation refueller with the RNZAF, is currently in Washington State in the United States taking part in Mobility Guardian, a biennial air mobility exercise.

More than 80 countries and more than 3,000 airmen, soldiers, sailors, and Marines are taking part alongside the United States Air Force in the exercise, which is designed to sharpen airmen’s skills in dynamic, contested environments.

The RNZAF has sent a C-130 Hercules aircraft, with two crews and a support team.

Leading Aircraftman Evans, a former St John’s College student, was attracted to the Air Force at age 17, after hearing about the opportunities it offered.

“A family friend gave me a good insight into the service,” he said. “You don’t necessarily know just how much opportunity and the trade variety that is available for people within the Air Force.”

Exercise Mobility Guardian is his latest overseas deployment. He has been to Australia for Exercise Talisman Sabre and Exercise Pitch Black and also spent time in Antarctica supporting the United States Antarctic programme.

When not on deployment he runs the ground fuel operations at the RNZAF Base Ohakea fuel section. His role includes day-to-day management of fuel operations, making sure fuel is delivered to aircraft on time, transport tasks and problem solving.

He also juggles study for a business degree.

“Defence has been great in supporting this,” he said. “I can work go and listen to a lecture and then come back to work – the flexibility is great.”

Leading Aircraftman Evans grew up competing in motocross but after a few significant injuries decided to look for another adrenaline-based sport that involved motors but wasn’t as hard on the body. Drifting got the tick and after building his own car he competes occasionally.

“With work and study I don’t get to compete that often but I support a friend who does it more seriously than I do.”

The Air Force had delivered everything he expected in a career, he said.

“I wanted to work in an organisation where there are opportunities to explore different areas, so people are not limited to what they choose on the first day. This is definitely the case here.

“The opportunities are there for you to go down various tracks. You’re not limited to what you can do or achieve. You can go down any path if you’re keen enough.”

This page was last reviewed on 15 August 2017, and is current.