NZDF

NZDF Appoints Military Assistant For UN Mission in South Sudan

The New Zealand Defence Force has appointed Lieutenant Colonel Neville Mosley to serve as Military Assistant to the head of the United Nations peacekeeping mission in South Sudan.
The New Zealand Defence Force has appointed Lieutenant Colonel Neville Mosley to serve as Military Assistant to the head of the United Nations peacekeeping mission in South Sudan. 

12 June 2017

The New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) has appointed a senior Army officer to serve as Military Assistant to the head of the United Nations peacekeeping mission in South Sudan.

Lieutenant Colonel Neville Mosley, who was the NZDF’s Senior National Officer in South Sudan from February to October 2015, will take up his new role as Military Assistant to the Special Representative of the UN Secretary General (SRSG), former New Zealand MP David Shearer, in early June. His appointment raises the number of NZDF members posted to the war-torn North African country to four.
 
“I hope to be able to support the SRSG in making a positive difference in what is a challenging environment,” Lieutenant Colonel Mosley said.

“Given my background, I have a good knowledge of the country as well as the issues and challenges facing it. I also have a good understanding of how the UN works with respect to the mission.”

Lieutenant Colonel Mosley joined the New Zealand Army in 1997. A military engineer, he has been deployed previously to Iraq, Afghanistan and Timor-Leste.

As Military Assistant to the SRSG, Lieutenant Colonel Mosley will support Mr Shearer in his role, which includes leading a multinational peacekeeping force comprised of about 13,000 troops. He will also assist in the mission’s strategic planning.

Major General Tim Gall, the Commander Joint Forces New Zealand, said the latest NZDF contribution to UNMISS demonstrated New Zealand’s commitment to peace and stability on the African continent.

“It also affirms our commitment to collective security efforts through the United Nations,” Major General Gall said.

South Sudan, which gained independence from Sudan in July 2011, has for the last three years been riven by ethnic violence which has left thousands dead and displaced an estimated 1.7 million people.

The UN estimates that about 7.5 million people – or more than two-thirds of South Sudan’s population – are in urgent need of humanitarian assistance and a million children are severely malnourished.

This page was last reviewed on 13 June 2017, and is current.