NZDF

NZ Army Band Cuts Through To Win Prestigious Prize

30 August 2013

Major Graham Hickman, Director of Music for the New Zealand Army Band receives the Pooley Broadsword from General Sir Nick Houghton, Chief of the Defence Staff of the United Kingdom
Major Graham Hickman, Director of Music for the New Zealand Army Band receives the Pooley Broadsword from General Sir Nick Houghton, Chief of the Defence Staff of the United Kingdom

 

The New Zealand Army Band has taken out the top prize for their performances at the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo in Scotland.

The Pooley Broadsword, is presented every year to the top item, band or dance group that maintains consistently high performances throughout the three-week Tattoo.

Director of Music for the New Zealand Army Band, Major (MAJ) Graham Hickman accepted the prize on behalf of the band and described it as a great honour.

“Edinburgh hosts the largest and most popular Military Tattoo in the world and for a small band from the other side of the world we always punch above our weight.

"This year we arrived with a display we knew was special – the act was uniquely kiwi, with lots of variety and entertainment, and the troops really enjoyed performing it,” says MAJ Hickman.

“This Tattoo provides major international exposure for New Zealand and the New Zealand Defence Force, and our musicians were exceptional ambassadors. I’m very proud of them and the performances they displayed to the world."

MAJ Hickman says that without the hard work from everyone in the team, winning the award would not have been possible.

“This award belongs to every member of the band,” says MAJ Hickman.

The NZ Army Band returned to New Zealand this week after three weeks of sell out performances to around 210,000 people at the event and an estimated 100 million on international television.

The band’s act made headlines in early August when they performed their rendition of Psy’s Gangnam Style.

ENDS

For more information, contact Defence Communications Group on 021 487 980.

This page was last reviewed on 9 September 2013, and is current.