NZDF

RSA

The Royal New Zealand Returned and Services Association (RSA) exists to support and improve the lives of New Zealand's current and ex-service personnel, and their dependants.
Supporting those who have served.

Support Services offered by the RSA

The RSA offers a range of services to serving and ex-serving personnel of all ages, including younger  contemporary servicemen and women, and their dependants.

They can assist in obtaining entitlements and services for health-related conditions arising from operational service, advocate on your behalf, and provide or arrange support for conditions arising from non-operational service as required.

RSA support and advocacy is free and you do not need to be a member of the RSA to request assistance.

Some of the help the RSA provides includes:

  • RSA Club Card, including discounts from the likes of Public Trust, Vero and Noel Leeming.
  • Up to $500 towards the costs of an Outward Bound Course for any child of current or former NZDF personnel.
  • Family support in conjunction with Camp/Base family and community support staff.
  • Access to Poppy Day funds for all serving personnel, partners and dependents to alleviate need and hardship, and to assist with further education.
  • Assisting with applications to Veterans' Affairs and free advice and advocacy if claims are declined.
  • Confidential discussions with experienced and like-minded RSA Support Advisers for those serving and their spouse or partner.

About the RSA

In 1916 returning ANZACs established the National Returned Soldiers Association, to help soldiers and their dependants returning from the First World War. 100 years later, that organisation has become the RNZRSA.

The RSA honour this legacy by supporting past and present New Zealand Defence Force personnel and their families.

To find out more about the RSA's support services, go to: https://rsa.org.nz/support

Alternatively, ask to speak to a support advisor at your local RSA, or email enquiries to: enquiries@rsa.org.nz

This page was last reviewed on 17 October 2017, and is current.